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Sites within Jerusalem

On the northwest wall of the great Temple in Jerusalem stood the Antonia Fortress, built by Herod the Great and named after Mark Anthony, his friend and patron. Josephus, the Jewish historian, records this in his book, Antiquities of the Jews: “Now on the north side [of the temple] was built …

In 333 C.E., in the book The Pilgrim of Bordeaux, the author describes the place where the body of Jesus was laid after his crucifixion. He wrote: “On the left hand is the little hill of Golgotha where the lord was crucified. About a stone’s throw from thence is a vault [crypta] …

The City of David is the Israeli name for an ancient core of settlement in Jerusalem dating back to the Bronze Age, which is now a major archaeological site. It is on a narrow ridge running south from the Temple Mount in the predominantly Palestinian neighborhood of Silwan in East …

Damascus Gate is one of the main entrances to the Old City of Jerusalem. It is located in the wall on the city’s northwest side where the highway leads out to Nablus, and from there, in times past, to the capital of Syria, Damascus. The latter name, in use continuously …

The Dome of the Rock is a shrine located on the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem. It was initially completed in 691 C.E. at the order of Umayyad Caliph Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna and is one of the oldest works of Islamic architecture. The domed …

The Garden of Gethsemane is located near the eastern side of Jerusalem, across the steep gorge called the Kidron Valley and up the sudden slope of the Mount of Olives. The word “Gethsemane” literally means “oil press.” The original garden was located in a grove of olive trees, and there …

Another location where pilgrims worship is just outside the city walls of Jerusalem and close to the Damascus Gate, near some cliffs that have the appearance of a skull. It is called the Garden Tomb. Many believe that this garden tomb was the place where Joseph of Arimathaea buried Jesus. …

Golgotha is the Greek term meaning the place of a skull. Because it was a place of execution and burial, it would have been outside the city walls of Jerusalem. This is the location where it is recorded that Jesus was crucified. Perhaps it had the appearance of a skull …

Hezekiah’s Tunnel, or the Siloam Tunnel, is a tunnel that was dug underneath the City of David in Jerusalem in ancient times. Its popular name is based upon the most common hypothesis of its origin, namely, that it dates from the reign of Hezekiah of Judah (late 8th and early …

There is a church built on the slopes of Mount Zion.  According to tradition, this was the location of the palace of the high priest, Caiaphas, where Jesus was brought to trial after his arrest in Gethsemane.  Its name, Gallicantu, means “cock’s-crow.”  This refers to Peter’s three-time denial of knowing Christ Jesus, …

The Huldah Gates are the two sets of now-blocked gates in the Southern Wall of the Temple Mount, situated in Jerusalem’s Old City.         The western set is a double-arched gate (the double gate), and the eastern is a triple-arched gate (the triple gate). Each arch of …

Jaffa Gate is a stone portal in the historic walls of the Old City of Jerusalem. It is one of eight gates in Jerusalem’s Old City walls. Jaffa Gate is the only one of the Old City gates positioned at a right angle to the wall. This could have been …

According to the Book of Genesis in the Bible, Jehovah-jireh (or Yahweh-yireh, YHWH will provide), was a place in the land of Moriah. It was the location of the binding of Isaac, where God told Abraham to offer his son Isaac as a burnt offering. Abraham named the place after the LORD provided …

Moriah is the name given to a mountain range by the Book of Genesis, in which context it is the location of the sacrifice of Isaac. Traditionally, Moriah has been interpreted as the name of the specific mountain at which this occurred, rather than just the name of the range. …

The Mount of Olives, or Mount Olivet, is a mountain ridge east of and adjacent to Jerusalem’s Old City.  It is named for the vast olive groves that at one time covered the slopes.       It rises 2,684 feet above sea level.  The peak to its north is …

In Hebrew the name “Bethesda” means “house of mercy,” and this may be more of a symbolic meaning than the name of the actual area.  The location was known as Bezetha after the Brook of Bezetha.  In some early manuscripts (the Codex Sinaiticus and the Codex Bezae) the name appears as Bethzatha.  The …

The Pool of Siloam is a rock-cut pool on the southern slope of the City of David, the original site of Jerusalem, located outside the walls of the Old City to the southeast. The pool was fed by the waters of the Gihon Spring, carried there by two aqueducts. The …

The Temple Mount is one of the most important sites in the Old City of Jerusalem.  It rises above the Kidron Valley and is enclosed by walls measuring 913 x 1,515 x 1,586 x 1,050.  Think of it terms of 12 soccer fields or 20 football fields to fill the …

The Western Wall, or Wailing Wall, is located in the Old City of Jerusalem at the foot of the western side of the Temple Mount. It is a remnant of the ancient wall that surrounded the Jewish Temple’s courtyard, and is arguably the most sacred site recognized by the Jewish …