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Biblical and Historical Sites

Amphipolis – The city is located in the district of Macedonia three miles from the Aegean Sea, and 30 miles southwest of Philippi. Paul and Silas pass through the city during the second missionary journey (Acts 17:1).

Apollonia is a city in Macedonia, 30 miles from Amphipolis and 38 miles from Thessalonica. Paul and Silas travel through the city on their way to Thessalonica (Acts 17:1).

Athens is the capital city of Greece, named after the goddess Athena. The Parthenon (447-438 B.C.E.) was a temple to Athena for some 900 years. Paul visited the city on his second missionary journey (Acts 17:22-31). Here, Paul debated with the Jews in the marketplace and even with philosophers. Mars …

Berea is a town in Macedonia, 50 miles southwest of Thessalonica. Timothy, Silas, and Paul visit here on the second missionary journey. The Jews are very receptive to Paul’s message (Acts 17:10-14; 20:1-5).

Paul travels through Clauda on his final journey to Rome.  Clauda is a small island north of Crete. Paul’s ship is forced by strong winds near to the island. The lee side of the island allows the crew to prepare for the storm.

Corinth is a Greek city and the capital of the Roman province of Achaia, and is located two miles inland from the Gulf of Corinth and 40 miles west of Athens. During the time of Paul, the city has a great Temple of Apollo, an agora or marketplace with shops, …

Cos is a Greek island in the eastern region of the Aegean Sea.  It housed a sanctuary of Aesculapius, the god of medicine.  One of the houses in its medical center contained Hippocrates’ School of Medicine (460-377 B.C.E.)  Hippocrates lived here most of life.  Many Jews also lived on the …

Paul travels through Crete on his final journey to Rome. Paul had commissioned Titus to stay here and carry on the mission of the church by counteracting Jewish leanings. Crete is a large island (173 miles long) in the Aegan Sea, southeast of Greece. During the Day of Pentecost, some …

Mytilene was founded in the 11th century B.C.E.  It is the capital and port of the island of Lesbos and also the capital of the North Aegean Region. The Romans, among whom was a young Julius Caesar, successfully defeated Mytilene in 80 B.C.E. It is historically referred to as the Siege of Mytilene. …

Neapolis was a town on the northern shore of the Aegean, originally belonging to Thrace but later falling within the Roman province of Macedonia. It was the seaport of Philippi, and was the first point in Europe at which Paul and his companions landed.  From Troas they had sailed direct …

Philippi is located on the eastern coast of Macedonia, ten miles from the Aegean Sea, with Neapolis as its port. King Philip II of Macedonia (father of Alexander the Great) renamed the city during his reign (359-336 B.C.E.). In 42 B.C.E. this city is the site of a battle between …

Rhodes is an island in Greece, located in the eastern Aegean Sea. In the 1st century C.E., the Emperor Tiberius spent a brief term of exile on Rhodes. St. Paulbrought Christianity to people on the island. Historically, Rhodes was famous worldwide for the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The Medieval Old Town of the City …

Samothracia is an island in the northeastern Aegean Sea. Paul lands here before traveling to Neapolis (Acts 16:11) on his second missionary journey with Silas, Timothy, and Luke. Paul may have landed here before sailing to Troas (Acts 20:6).